John D. Allen, 10N 48W



John D. Allen of Denver, 34, born in Pennsylvania to Thomas Allen and Mary Dayton, married Emma L. Frigenbauer of Omaha, 23, born in Iowa, daughter of H. R. Fiegenbauer and Elizabeth Krimpel on September 27, 1887 in Omaha, Nebraska.

Emma was in LaCrosse, Wisconsin in 1880, 16, born in Iowa, Charles 10 Iowa, Arthur 7, Iowa, Lula 1 and Adelina one month born in Wisconsin.
Father is Henry Fiegenbaum, 43, a Methodist pastor, with wife Hellwig, 28.
Henry is buried in Hancock County, Iowa 1837-1908 # 27527937. So is Elizabeth A. (Kreumpel) Fiegenbaum 1837-1877 # 113387082.

John claimed a tract in section 6, 10N 48W in 1888.


In 1900 Denver, John, born February 1853 in Pennsylvania, is a jeweler, married 12 years to Emma April 1865 Iowa. Kenneth D. May 1889, Dorothy A Feb 1893, and Beulah May 1900 all three born in Colorado.

In 1904 John is the treasurer of the Denver Temple Masonic Lodge No. 84.

In 1910 Denver, John is a real estate agent, 57, Emma L. 45, Kenneth D. 20, Dorothy 17, and Lorene A. 9.

In 1912 Denver, John D. Allen is a real estate agent, officed in 508 Empire Building.

In 1920 Denver, John is a real estate dealer, 66, Emma 55, with Kenneth D. a physician, and Lorene 19.

Emma L. Allen 1865-1922 is buried in Denver, # 58402629. In the same cemetery is John D. Allen 1853-1931 # 58402633.

Emma, residing at 2055 S. Columbia Avenue in Denver, died in Chicago October 27, 1922, born April 20, 1865 in Ohio, father FUgenbaum.

Emma's sister Adelaide F. Vetsch 1880-1936 is buried in Gooding County, Idaho # 38439398.

Emma's brother "Charles H. Fiegenbaum, president of the Index Galena Lumber Company, one of the foremost business enterprises of Index, Snohomish county, was born at Charles City, Iowa, October 22 1869, a son of the Rev. H. R. and Elizabeth (Krumpel) Fiegenbaum, both of whom were natives of St. Charles, Missouri. In early life they removed to Iowa and the father became a pioneer Methodist Episcopal minister of that state, where he continued his labors as a preacher of the gospel for many years. In 1901 he arrived in eastern Washington, where he afterward lived a retired life, passing away in 1910 at the age of seventy-three years. His wife died in 1878 at the age thirty-five years. In their family were three children: Mrs. John D. Allen, now living in Denver, Colorado; Charles H.; and Arthur F., who resides in Honolulu, Hawaii."

In 1921, Kenneth Dayton Allison Allen applied for membership in SAR, born May 9, 1889.
"Dr. Allen's father, John D. Allen, who was born in Easton, Pennsylvania, came to Colorado in 1879 and prospered as a jeweler and a real estate developer as well in Denver. He also served in the State Legislature."
Possibly Lorene A. Allen never married 1900-1991 buried in Denver 3 58402635.

Dorothy A. Allen married Weaver Curtis Barrett on Sept 4, 1919 in Denver.
They're in St. Louis in 1930, Weaver a manager of a fur company, 40, born in Missouri, with Dorothy 37 Colorado. Barbara 9, Doris 7, Patricia E. 6, and Judith D. 4 all born in MIssouri.

Weaver and Dorothy are in Porter County, Indiana in 1940 - he's running an office supply company in Chicago. Barbara is 19, Jean 17, Patricia 6, and Judity 9.

Weaver, per one tree, died Sept 23, 1974 in Denver.

It also said Patricia E. died October 13, 1967 in Denver

Dorothy Allen Barrett 1893-1986 is buried in Denver, # 58402677.

Jean Barrett Scott, born Aug 21, 1922, died December 4, 1989.
HAROLD G SCOTT Lakewood, Colorado
Feb 17, 1921 - Sep 13, 2012

Judith Dayton Hester, 82, of Greeley, Colo., passed away Tuesday, May 6, 2008, at Bonell Good Samaritan Center. She was born Nov. 3, 1925, to Dorothy Abegaile (Allen) Barrett and Weaver Curtis Barrett in St. Louis, Mo.
Judy was graduated from high school in Meeker, Colo., and attended Colorado College where she met Rex. W. Hester of Pisgah, Iowa, and they married in 1947 in Meeker. The Hesters lived in Stratford and Vinton, Iowa, before moving to Idaho Springs, Brighton and Littleton, Colo.
They had two children, Kent and Kyle Anne. Judy was a stay home mother while they were in school. She later worked as a secretary of the Idaho Springs Lumber Company, Brighton Community Hospital and the Little Daily newspaper.
In 1969, the Hesters moved to Greeley where Judy worked for Greeley School District No. 6 for 17 years, retiring in 1986 as the assistant supervisor of transportation.
Judy was a member of the First Congregational Church, 25-year member of the Greeley Assistance League and a past member of three bowling leagues.
She loved to golf and was an avid sports fan of the Greeley Central Wildcats, Denver Broncos and Colorado Rockies.
The Hesters traveled extensively throughout the world and all 50 states. Judy especially liked the state of Nevada for the casinos and floor shows.
The greatest joy in her life was her children and grandchildren, although she never got to know the great-grandchildren.
The Hesters celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in June 2007.
Judith is survived by her husband, Rex Hester of Greeley; daughter Kyle Anne (Mark) Lucks of Loveland, Colo.; son Kent (Cindy) Hester of Kremmling, Colo.; grandchildren Forrest Hester; Nathan (Laura) Hester; Joshua (Julia) Hester; Jolene Hester (Chad Colley); Tyler Lucks; Kelsey Lucks (Gene Reed); and Mackenzie Lucks; great-grandchildren Kolbey (Lexi) Hester; Aida (Blair) Hester; Emily Hester; Payton, Harley and Reagan Colley; Trey Reed and numerous nieces and nephews.
Judith was preceded in death by her parents and her three sisters; Barbara Lucy, Jean Scott and Patricia Froelicker.
A memorial service was held May 10 at Allnutt Funeral Service of Greeley, Colo.


Patricia Froelicher 1924-1967 is buried in Denver # 58402872.

Francis Charles Froelicher 1924-2014 is buried in Denver - in another cemetery # 182785336.

Back in Baltimore, Chuck enrolled at Johns Hopkins University, studied for three years, and graduated in 1949 with a B.A. degree and a focus on biology. That same year, on May 21, he married Patricia Allen Barrett, a dancer, singer, and stage performer from the ranching town of Meeker, Colorado. They had met at Colorado College a year earlier while he was taking a summer Spanish course to fulfill a requirement for Hopkins. Pat was studying dance with Hanya Holm, one of the " Big Four" founders of modern dance. Shortly before his graduation, Chuck applied for teaching jobs at seven independent schools. " I wrote seven application letters and got seven offers," Chuck recalled. " I chose Avon Old Farms because it was the only school that offered housing for married couples. Deerfield, Choate, and the others didn't offer apartments."30 Chuck and Pat settled into life at Avon near Connecticut's Farmington Valley. The school remains a coat-and-tie school where boys write their own histories, in the words of Francis M. Froelicher, " Uncle Pete," the school's first headmaster (1927-29). But long before Chuck was hired as a science teacher, Francis had moved west with his call to " write your own history" and became the founding headmaster of the Fountain Valley School in Colorado Springs, where he presided from 1930 to 1950. The couple remained at Avon from the fall of 1949 to the summer of 1952. Chuck taught general science and biology and, put in charge of the school's community service program, started three business ventures with students. Taking advantage of large maple-tree groves on campus, they tapped the trees to drain the sap and make syrup, which they sold to school families. They built a trout hatchery on a small feeder stream and released the fry to build the trout population. In a similar vein, they hatched and released hundreds of pheasants. In addition, Froelicher wove a passionate concern for current affairs into the culture of the school. For several years, Avon won awards from a national publicaion that sponsored current-events contests for students.33 Pat managed the school store, which sold books and supplies to the boarding students. Intended to generate income for Pat, the store lost money. Chuck described her as: " An artist, yes. A manager of a small business, no." When the store's losses equaled Chuck's annual salary, he took over. By the end of the year, the store had broken even. By June of the following year, 1952, it had made a substantial profit.34 A school parent recognized Chuck's aptitude for business and, being an executive with the J.C. Penney company, offered Chuck a job with any Penney's store in the American West. Chuck chose Denver. He had become restless at Avon Old Farms, and Colorado beckoned. Thus began the peripatetic phase of Chuck's life. A series of rapid job changes reflected his varied talents as he: sold men's clothing at JC Penney in Denver for nine months; moved to Meeker to work on his father-inlaw's ranch, the Bar WK, baling hay and mending fences; accepted a job in August, 1953 to serve as dean of the Arizona Desert School near Tucson AZ, but the school failed to raise sufficient funds to begin the school year and closed permanently; drove to California with Pat to seek work and, at a cook-out, met a school superintendent who offered him a job teaching math and algebra at El Sausal Junior High School in Salinas; Back in Baltimore, Chuck enrolled at Johns Hopkins University, studied for three years, and graduated in 1949 with a B.A. degree and a focus on biology. That same year, on May 21, he married Patricia Allen Barrett, a dancer, singer, and stage performer from the ranching town of Meeker, Colorado. They had met at Colorado College a year earlier while he was taking a summer Spanish course to fulfill a requirement for Hopkins. Pat was studying dance with Hanya Holm, one of the " Big Four" founders of modern dance. Shortly before his graduation, Chuck applied for teaching jobs at seven independent schools. " I wrote seven application letters and got seven offers," Chuck recalled. " I chose Avon Old Farms because it was the only school that offered housing for married couples. Deerfield, Choate, and the others didn't offer apartments."30 Chuck and Pat settled into life at Avon near Connecticut's Farmington Valley. The school remains a coat-andtie school where boys " write their own histories," in the words of Francis M. Froelicher, " Uncle Pete," the school's first headmaster (1927-29). But long before Chuck was hired as a science teacher, Francis had moved west with his call to " write your own history" and became the founding headmaster of the Fountain Valley School in Colorado Springs, where he presided from 1930 to 1950.32 The couple remained at Avon from the fall of 1949 to the summer of 1952. Chuck taught general science and biology and, put in charge of the school's community service program, started three business ventures with students. Taking advantage of large maple-tree groves on campus, they tapped the trees to drain the sap and make syrup, which they sold to school families. They built a trout hatchery on a small feeder stream and released the fry to build the trout population. In a similar vein, they hatched and released hundreds of pheasants. In addition, Froelicher wove a passionate concern for current affairs into the culture of the school. For several years, Avon won awards from a national publication that sponsored current-events contests for students.33 Pat managed the school store, which sold books and supplies to the boarding students. Intended to generate income for Pat, the store lost money. Chuck described her as: " An artist, yes. A manager of a small business, no." When the store's losses equaled Chuck's annual salary, he took over. By the end of the year, the store had broken even. By June of the following year, 1952, it had made a substantial profit.34 A school parent recognized Chuck's aptitude for business and, being an executive with the J.C. Penney company, offered Chuck a job with any Penney's store in the American West. Chuck chose Denver. He had become restless at Avon Old Farms, and Colorado beckoned. Thus began the peripatetic phase of Chuck's life. A series of rapid job changes reflected his varied talents as he: sold men's clothing at JC Penney in Denver for nine months; moved to Meeker to work on his father-inlaw's ranch, the Bar WK, baling hay and mending fences; accepted a job in August, 1953 to serve as dean of the Arizona Desert School near Tucson AZ, but the school failed to raise sufficient funds to begin the school year and closed permanently; drove to California with Pat to seek work and, at a cook-out, met a school superintendent who offered him a job teaching math and algebra at El Sausal Junior High School in Salinas;


F. Charles (Chuck) Froelicher died peacefully at his home in Denver, Colorado on October 17, 2014. He was 89.
Chuck became the first executive director of the Gates Family Foundation in 1975 and, during the next 17 years, promoted projects that will continue to benefit Colorado's citizens and visitors into the foreseeable future. He regarded the foundation's support as " educational and environmental venture capital." 
A passionate preserver of open space and scenic beauty, Froelicher made the foundation an early supporter of the South Platte River Greenway, which has transformed the South Platte and Cherry Creek waterways as they run through Denver and beyond. In 40 years, the Greenway has grown from stagnant creeks and midnight dumps into more than 150 miles of model biking and hiking paths, boat launches and parks. " Of all the things I have worked on," Froelicher said in a 2014 interview, " the Greenway may have the most long-lasting impact."
Froelicher also championed educational choice and, in 1989, used the foundation's resources to organize a seminal conference on the subject.
A man of great scope and tenacity, Froelicher was the founding headmaster of Colorado Academy, the prime mover acheter viagra in bringing Outward Bound to the United States, a founder of the Copper Mountain ski resort, a champion of Denver Botanic Gardens as an independent non-profit organization, and a force behind establishing both the Sangree Hut in the 10th Mountain Division hut system and the South Platte River Greenway that runs through Denver. Numerous awards attest to his focus, tenacity, and accomplishment.  
Although we knew it was coming, his death still came as a shock to our family," wrote three of his grandchildren in an open letter to friends. " We were all convinced he was invincible."
Chuck knew how to create excitement in people," said Richard Lamm, a three-term Colorado governor and longtime friend of Froelicher. " He was tall, impressive, and articulate, and he knew how to bring the right people together."
Surprisingly for a headmaster, Froelicher had been an indifferent student. " I had the perfect background to start a school," he said during a 2012 interview, " because I have always had enormous sympathy for students who do not mature academically on a date certain. My Latin teacher said I used 5 percent of my brain on academics." He preferred sports, fly fishing, and exploring mountains and rivers.
Among his numerous awards, F. Charles Froelicher received the Kurt Hahn Award from Outward Bound USA in 1983, the George E. Cranmer Award from Colorado Open Lands in 1992, the Friend of the River Award from the Greenway Preservation Trust in 2003, and the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Johns Hopkins University in 2008.
A 2014 biography of Froelicher by Katherine Millett, Profile of a Schoolmaster, is available online at the Colorado Academy website in the Alumni section.
He is survived by a son, Franz Froelicher, and a daughter, Frederica Froelicher, from his  marriage to the late Patricia Barrett Froelicher; a brother, Frederic Sharpless Froelicher; four step-children from his marriage to the late Jane Stuart Righter Froelicher: Susannah Bristol, Charles Woolley, Christopher Woolley, and Thomas Woolley; and 10 grandchildren.